Cyclopital 3D Filter/Close Up Adaptor for Sony TD10 & NX3D1 – Video review

I’ve recently been trying out two of the adaptors available for the stereo 3D Camcorders the Sony NX3D1 & Sony HDR TD10 that may be of interest to 3D filmmakers using these cameras. One of the prime issues with any of these fixed interaxial 3D camcorders in 3D filmmaking is the limitations in terms of long shots and close ups both of which are tackled by different adaptors in the Cyclopital 3D range.

In this video, I first take a look at the filter/close up adaptor itself on the Sony HDR-NX3D1 and how to use it with the camcorder, thenI demonstrate the kind of close up shots that this adaptor extends the camcorders range.

Although different and untested Cyclopital 3D also offers adaptors for the Fuji W3 & W1 3D stills cameras as well as the JVC Stereoscopic 3D Camcorders the GS-TD1 and the GY-HMZ1U ProHD.

Check out the video on The Stereoscopic 3D Channel on YouTube and see the effect the adaptor has to expanding the usability of the camcorders.

Further details on the adaptors  are available from the Cyclopital 3D Website or if you’re based in the UK and or Europe the local distributor is www.3dglassesshop.com

3D Video Review: Cyclopital 3D Base Extender Adaptor for the Sony NX3D1 & Sony TD10

I’ve recently been trying out two of the adaptors available for the stereo 3D Camcorders the Sony NX3D1 & Sony HDR TD10 that may be of interest to 3D filmmakers using these cameras. One of the prime issues with any of these fixed interaxial 3D camcorders in 3D filmmaking is the limitations in terms of long shots and close ups both of which are tackled by different adaptors in the Cyclopital 3D range.

In a two part video, I first take a look at the base extender adaptor itself on the Sony HDR-NX3D1 and how to use it with the camcorder, then in part two I take it out on a trip to Edinburgh’s Royal Botanic Gardens to see how it fares on wide shots against simply using the camera’s standard fixed interaxial.

Although different and untested Cyclopital 3D also offers adaptors for the Fuji W3 & W1 3D stills cameras as well as the JVC Stereoscopic 3D Camcorders the GS-TD1 and the GY-HMZ1U ProHD.

Check out part one of our video on The Stereoscopic 3D Channel on YouTube and see the effect the adaptor has to expanding the usability of the camcorders.

Further details on the adaptors  are available from the Cyclopital 3D Website or if you’re based in the UK and or Europe the local distributor is www.3dglassesshop.com

PS – Part Two of the video review is available on YouTube now.

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Cyclopital 3D Adapters for Sony TD10 & NX3D1

I’ve just received a pair of adaptors for my Sony NX3D1 3D Camcorder made by Cycopital 3D and distributed in the UK by The 3D Glasses Shop. The adaptors extend the camcorder in a couple of ways, namely one adaptor extends the stereoscopic base from 31mm to 140mm, whilst the other adds the potential to attach filters to the camera and most interestingly to add close up lenses to enable closer shooting of subjects.

Due to our cold and rather miserable weather I’ve not yet had the opportunity to get out with the camera but I will be doing so soon and will share results on YouTube. In the meantime to find out more about these attachments head on over to Cyclopital3D.

Sony 3D Craft Training

sony-3d-training-centreI recently spent a few days with Sony in Basingstoke just outside London participating in their 3D Craft training course. The course was led by Graham Howe, an experienced stereographer and convergence puller who works regularly for Sky on their live 3D sports broadcasts. Graham’s real world experience of delivering 3D led to engaging and no-nonsense discussions without the irritatingly rigid stance of so many individuals I’ve come across in the 3D world.  I was also joined by  9 students from the National Film & Television School who to varying degrees took to the 3D concepts and equipment relatively easily.

On our first day, once we’d all settled in, we covered basic stereoscopic theory including all the typical topics of depth cues, convergence, adapting for screen sizes, etc. The day was interesting enough, although personally it was concepts and information I already knew so was nothing too challenging.

Day Two kicked off with a little more theory then we started to actually get to play with the assembled 3D Rig. It was an Element Technica Pulsar Rig (now 3ality Technica) with two Sony P1’s running into Sony’s MPE200 3D Box and out onto three large monitors. The monitors displayed a passive 3D view, a difference view for convergence adjustments and finally a view of various scopes and parameters from the analysis of the camera feeds. Using this software/hardware box, displays and motorised rig made creating controlled and near perfect 3D so simple I could hardly believe it – the issue of course is cost. The kit alone was probably worth £100K – £200K, then add in experienced crew and a rig technician you’ve got crazy money per day!

Day Three was effectively a full hands on day where we got to start from resolving rig issues using the Sony MPE box, thought to filming various scenes and deciding on the optimal convergence and inter-axial set-ups for each scenario. This was definitely the best part of the three days. Actually getting to work hands on with equipment that I’d never generally get near was fascinating and also demonstrated the huge gulf between amateur 3d kit and pro-level gear.

I had a fantastic time over the three day course but it left me pondering how to move forward with making slightly more challenging 3D shoots after Cycle 3D is complete. It’s quite frustrating that at the lower end we’re stuck with either fixed IA camcorders that really make it tricky to achieve good 3D (apart from within very confined boundaries), or with cobbled together solutions that are difficult to sync and impossible to monitor in real time.

I’d like to thank Sony for this great experience, now if you wouldn’t mind sending me a really big expensive rig I’ll get on with making my next 3D epic!

Check out some pictures from Sony’s 3D Training Centre.